How To Test Shift Solenoid A And B Assembly (1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 2.0L Honda CR-V)

This tutorial will help you to test the automatic transmission shift control solenoids A and B. Both of these shift solenoids are part of the same assembly.

One test involves testing the internal resistance of each solenoid and the other involves applying power (via a jumper wire) to each one.

NOTE: You can find the test procedures for the linear solenoid (clutch pressure control) assembly and the TCC lock-up solenoid assembly here:

  1. How To Test: A/T Clutch Pressure Control Solenoid (1997-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V).
  2. How To Test: TCC Solenoids A And B (1997-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V).

Symptoms Of A Defective Shift Solenoid A And B Assembly

Shift solenoid A and B assembly is located on the rear-bottom side of your Honda CR-V's automatic transmission (this is the side that faces toward the passenger side wheel).

Shift solenoid A and B assembly looks very similar in appearance to the torque converter clutch (TCC) solenoid A and B assembly. You can tell them apart because the:

  1. Shift solenoid A and B assembly's connector has:
    1. A blue with yellow stripe (BLU/YEL) wire.
    2. A green with white stripe (GRN/WHT) wire.
  2. TCC solenoid A and B assembly's connector has:
    1. A yellow (YEL) wire.
    2. A green with black stripe (GRN/BLK) wire.

Your Honda CR-V's automatic transmission is computer controlled so when one of the shift solenoids fails you're gonna' have one of the following trouble codes stored in the PCM's memory (and lighting the check engine light):

  1. P0753: Shift Solenoid Valve A
  2. P0758: Shift Solenoid Valve B

You're also gonna' see:

  1. Transmission stays in limp-in mode (no upshifting from 1st to higher gears).
  2. Erratic upshifting from a low gear to a higher gear.
  3. Transmission fails to downshift from 4th gear (stuck in 4th gear).

TEST 1: Shift Solenoid Resistance Test

How To Test Shift Solenoid A And B Assembly (1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 2.0L Honda CR-V)

The very first thing we're gonna' do is to check the resistance of each solenoid within the solenoid assembly.

The resistance specification of each solenoid is: 12-25 Ohms and we'll check it with a multimeter in Ohms mode.

NOTE: This test is done on the connector of the shift solenoid assembly itself, which has male spade terminals.

OK, these are the test steps:

  1. 1

    Place your multimeter in Ohms mode.

  2. 2

    Disconnect shift solenoid assembly A and B from its electrical connector.

  3. 3

    To check solenoid A, measure the resistance between terminal labeled with the #1 and the solenoid assembly's body (see the illustration above).

    NOTE: Shift solenoid A is grounded by the solenoid assembly's case. If the solenoid assembly is still bolted to the transmission housing, you can ground your multimeter's lead directly on the battery's negative (-) terminal.

  4. 4

    To check solenoid B, measure the resistance between terminal labeled with the #2 and the solenoid assembly's body (see the illustration above).

    NOTE: Shift solenoid B is grounded by the solenoid assembly's case. If the solenoid assembly is still bolted to the transmission housing, you can ground your multimeter's lead directly on the battery's negative (-) terminal.

  5. 5

    Your multimeter should read 12-25 Ohms for the resistance value of shift solenoid A.

Let's analyze your resistance test results:

CASE 1: Resistance was between 12-25 Ohms for both solenoids. This is the correct and expected test result and generally means that shift solenoid A and shift solenoid B are OK.

Although the shift solenoid A and B passed this test, we have one more test to do. This is to manually apply power to the solenoids and see if each one clicks (when it gets power). For this test go to: TEST 2: Applying 12 Volts To Shift Solenoid A And B.

CASE 2: Resistance WAS NOT between 12-25 Ohms. Recheck your multimeter test connections and retest. If you still don't get the correct resistance... then shift solenoid A is bad and needs to be replaced.

There's a good chance that shift solenoid A passed TEST 1 with flying colors... yet a trouble code P0735 continues to light the D4 light and/or check engine light on the instrument cluster.

So the next step, after measuring shift solenoid A's internal resistance, is to manually apply 12 Volts to terminal #2 and see if the solenoid clicks.