STEP 4: Testing The Dead Cylinder's Fuel Injector

Location Of The Resonator Chamber Of The Intake Manifold. How To Troubleshoot Misfire Trouble Codes (1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 2.0L Honda CR-V)

So far you have confirmed that the dead cylinder has spark and that it has good compression.

Our next step is to check the internal resistance of the dead cylinder's fuel injector and make sure that it hasn't short-circuited internally. We can do this by doing a simple multimeter resistance test on it.

We can then compare the dead cylinder's fuel injector resistance value with the adjacent cylinder's fuel injector (or any other cylinder that is not misfiring) to see if its resistance value is similar.

If the resistance value is similar, then you can conclude that the fuel injector's internal coil is OK.

If the resistance value is drastically different, then you can conclude that the fuel injector's internal coil is defective and the fuel injector is the cause of the misfire condition and misfire trouble code lighting up the check engine light.

Now, the one thing that complicates testing the fuel injectors on the 1999, 2000, and 2001 Honda CR-V is that the intake manifold's resonator chamber blocks access to cylinder #2 and #3 fuel injectors (the arrow in the photo above points to the resonator chamber).

Removing the intake manifold's resonator chamber is not hard, and once removed, you'll be able to test the fuel injector resistance of cylinders #2 and #3.

In case you're wondering, there isn't a specific resistance specification available from Honda for the fuel injectors on the 1997-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V.

STEP 5: Checking For Vacuum Leaks Around Intake Manifold

There's a good chance that a vacuum leak could be causing a P0300 misfire trouble code on your 2.0L Honda CR-V.

A very ‘old school’ way of testing for vacuum leaks is to spray carburetor cleaner spray around the suspected area of the vacuum leak. This is a very simple and easy task to do but for safety reasons it's important that you perform it with a completely cold engine.

The most common problem areas, for vacuum leaks, are the intake manifold gasket and the resonator chamber o-ring.

In a nutshell what you're gonna' do is to start your Honda CR-V's engine and then while it's idling, you're gonna' spray short bursts of carb-cleaner spray around the area the intake manifold meets the cylinder head. You'll also need to spray around the area where the resonator chamber connects to the intake manifold plenum.

If there's a vacuum leak, the carb-cleaner fluid will get sucked into the engine (at the vacuum leak point) and you'll notice the engine's idle will change.

Once you've located the source of the vacuum leak, the next step is to replace the gasket or vacuum hose that's causing it.

More 2.0L Honda CR-V Tutorials

You can find a complete list of tutorials here: Honda 2.0L Index Of Articles.

Here's a sample of the tutorials you'll find there:

  1. How To Test For A Blown Head Gasket (1997-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V).
  2. How To Test The Ignition Coil (1999-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V).
  3. How To Test The TPS (1997-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V).
  4. How To Test The MAP Sensor (1997-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V).
  5. How To Test Engine Compression (1997-2001 2.0L Honda).

On YouTube, check out my following videos:

  1. How To Test The Ignition Coil (1999-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V) (at YouTube).
  2. How To Test The Ignition Control Module (1999, 2000, 2001 2.0L Honda CR-V) (at YouTube).
  3. How To Test The Fuel Pump (1997-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V) (at: YouTube).
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