Fuel Pressure Test: With Fuel Pressure Test Port Type 2

If the fuel pressure test port looks like the one in photo 1 of 3, then this is the section for you.

The connect the fuel pressure test gauge to the test port, we're gonna' remove the bolt sitting on top of the test port. The arrow points to this bolt in photo 1 of 3.

This bolt is a M6 x 1.0 bolt. Once removed, we'll install a M6 x 1.0 external adapter in its place (see photo 2 of 3).

NOTE: If your particular 2.2L Honda Accord does not have a fuel pressure test port on the fuel injector rail, then go to this section: Fuel Pressure Test: Without A Fuel Pressure Test Port On Fuel Injector Rail.

These are the test steps:

  1. 1

    Remove the bolt on top of the fuel pressure test port. The orange arrow points to the bolt that sits on top of the fuel pressure test port (see image 1 of 3).

    IMPORTANT: There is a copper sealing washer beneath this bolt. As you remove the bolt, be careful that it doesn't fall off and get lost -you'll need it! If you lose it, you'll need to buy it from your Honda dealership (or at a junkyard).

  2. 2

    Install the brass adapter in place of the bolt you just removed (see photo 2 of 3).

    The M6 x 1.0 external adapter should have an O-ring that will seal the test adapter to the fuel pressure test port. If it doesn't have it, use the sealing washer.

  3. 3

    Connect the fuel pressure gauge to the adapter.

  4. 4

    Have your helper crank the engine while you check for fuel leaks around the test adapter.

    If you find fuel leaks, resolve them before moving on to the next test step.

  5. 5

    If no fuel leaks, have your helper crank the engine while you observe the fuel pressure test gauge.

  6. 6

    If the engine starts, you should see:

    1994-1997: 38-47 PSI with the fuel pressure regulator's vacuum hose disconnected.

    1994-1997: 30-38 PSI with the fuel pressure regulator's vacuum hose connected.

  7. 7

    If the engine DOES NOT start, you should see:

    1994-1997: 38-47 PSI with the fuel pressure regulator's vacuum hose disconnected.

Let's take a look at what your results mean:

CASE 1: The fuel pressure is 0 PSI. This test result lets you know that the fuel pump is not supplying the engine with fuel. This generally means that the fuel pump has failed.

To make sure, you've got to make sure that the fuel pump fuse is OK and that power is reaching the fuel pump when you crank the engine. If both of these tests are passed, then you can confidently conclude that the fuel pump is bad.

CASE 2: The fuel pressure is lower than the indicated pressure specification. This test result lets you know that the fuel pump is not supplying enough fuel to the engine.

This low fuel pressure will cause the air/fuel mixture to run 'lean' and cause a trouble code P0171 to light up the check engine light.

Before you replace the fuel pump, replace the fuel filter and repeat the fuel pressure test. If the fuel pressure is now within the indicated specification, you don't need to replace the fuel pump.

If the fuel pressure is still not within specification (after replacing the fuel filter), then the fuel pump is bad and needs to be replaced.

CASE 3: The fuel pressure is within the indicated specification while the engine was cranking. This is the correct test result and lets you know that the fuel pump is working correctly.

If the engine is not starting, then you can conclude that the fuel pump itself is not behind the problem.

Fuel Pressure Test: Without A Fuel Pressure Test Port On Fuel Injector Rail

Some of the 2.2L Honda Accords covered by this tutorial don't come equipped with a fuel pressure test port. But it's nothing to worry about, the fuel pump's pressure can still be tested.

In these vehicles, you'll need to remove the fuel filter's banjo bolt and install a M12 x 1.25 external adapter in its place.

Image 2 of 2, in the image viewer above, illustrates how this is done.

These are the test steps:

  1. 1

    Remove the banjo bolt from the fuel filter. The orange arrow points to the banjo bolt.

    IMPORTANT: There are two copper sealing washers that are used to seal the banjo bolt to the fuel filter. As you remove the banjo bolt, be careful that they don't fall off and get lost -you'll need them! If you lose them, you'll need to buy a new fuel filter that have them included.

  2. 2

    Install the brass adapter in place of the banjo bolt.

    You'll need to use the copper sealing washers (from the banjo bolt) to seal the test adapter to the fuel filter.

  3. 3

    Connect the fuel pressure gauge to the adapter.

  4. 4

    Have your helper crank the engine while you check for fuel leaks around the test adapter.

    If you find fuel leaks, resolve them before moving on to the next test step.

  5. 5

    If no fuel leaks, have your helper crank the engine while you observe the fuel pressure test gauge.

  6. 6

    If the engine starts, you should see:

    1994-1997: 38-47 PSI with the fuel pressure regulator's vacuum hose disconnected.

    1994-1997: 30-38 PSI with the fuel pressure regulator's vacuum hose connected.

  7. 7

    If the engine DOES NOT start, you should see:

    1994-1997: 38-47 PSI with the fuel pressure regulator's vacuum hose disconnected.

Let's take a look at what your results mean:

CASE 1: The fuel pressure is 0 PSI. This test result lets you know that the fuel pump is not supplying the engine with fuel. This generally means that the fuel pump has failed.

To make sure, you've got to make sure that the fuel pump fuse is OK and that power is reaching the fuel pump when you crank the engine. If both of these tests are passed, then you can confidently conclude that the fuel pump is bad.

CASE 2: The fuel pressure is lower than the indicated pressure specification. This test result lets you know that the fuel pump is not supplying enough fuel to the engine.

This low fuel pressure will cause the air/fuel mixture to run 'lean' and cause a trouble code P0171 to light up the check engine light.

Before you replace the fuel pump, replace the fuel filter and repeat the fuel pressure test. If the fuel pressure is now within the indicated specification, you don't need to replace the fuel pump.

If the fuel pressure is still not within specification (after replacing the fuel filter), then the fuel pump is bad and needs to be replaced.

CASE 3: The fuel pressure is within the indicated specification while the engine was cranking. This is the correct test result and lets you know that the fuel pump is working correctly.

If the engine is not starting, then you can conclude that the fuel pump itself is not behind the problem.

Honda Vehicles:

  • Accord 2.2L
    • 1994,
      1995,
      1996,
      1997