TEST 1: Testing The Power Circuit for 12 Volts

Testing The Power Circuit for 12 Volts. MAF Sensor Test (2.4L, 3.0L Mitsubishi 1999-2004)

The very first thing that has to be checked is that the MAF sensor on your Mitsubishi vehicle (or Chrysler Sebring or Dodge Stratus) is getting power (10 to 12 Volts), since without this voltage it won't work.

You can use a 12 Volt test light or a multimeter for this test, although the following test steps assume you're using a multimeter:

  1. 1

    Place the multimeter in Volts DC mode and disconnect the the MAF sensor from its connector.

  2. 2

    Connect the red multimeter test lead to the wire identified with the number 4 (see photo above) using an appropriate tool.

  3. 3

    Connect the black test lead of the multimeter to a good Ground point on the engine or to the battery negative terminal.

  4. 4

    Turn the key to the ON position and observe the voltage value the multimeter registers.

  5. 5

    The multimeter should register between 10 to 12 Volts DC.

Let's take a look at what your test results mean:

CASE 1: The multimeter registered 10 to 12 Volts DC (or the if the test light came on), then this indicates that the MAF sensor is getting juice (12 Volts). The next step is to verify that it's also getting a good Ground, go to TEST 2.

CASE 2: The multimeter DID NOT register 10 to 12 Volts DC (or the if the test light DID NOT come on), your next step is to find out why this voltage is missing since without power, the MAF won't work. Repairing the cause of the missing voltage will solve the MAF issue/problem lighting up the check engine on your car.

TEST 2: Testing The Ground Circuit

MAF Sensor Test (2.4L, 3.0L Mitsubishi 1999-2004)

Testing the ground circuit follows pretty much the same procedure as the test steps for testing the power circuit.

Ground is fed to the MAF sensor by the wire labeled with the number 5 in the photo above.

NOTE: This ground is provided internally by the PCM, so you have to be careful NOT to short this circuit to power (12 Volts) or you'll damage the PCM.

OK, here are the steps:

  1. 1

    Place the multimeter in Volts DC mode and disconnect the MAF sensor from its connector.

  2. 2

    Connect the black multimeter test lead to the black (or black with white stripe) wire identified with the number 5, in the photo above, using an appropriate tool.

  3. 3

    Connect the red test lead of the multimeter to the battery positive (+) terminal.

  4. 4

    Turn the key to the ON position and observe the voltage value the multimeter registers.

  5. 5

    The multimeter should register between 10 to 12 Volts DC.

Let's take a look at what your test results mean:

CASE 1: The multimeter registered 10 to 12 Volts DC (or the if the test light came on), then this indicates that the MAF sensor has a good Ground. The next step is to verify that the MAF sensor is creating a good MAF signal based on the airflow the engine is breathing, go to TEST 3.

CASE 2: The multimeter DID NOT register 10 to 12 Volts DC (or the if the test light DID NOT come on), this exonerates the MAF sensor as being bad, since without a good Ground, the MAF sensor will not work and this will light up the check engine light (CEL) on your instrument cluster. Repairing the cause of the missing voltage will solve the problem.

Chrysler Vehicles:

  • Sebring 2.4L (SOHC)
    • 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

Dodge Vehicles:

  • Stratus 2.4L (SOHC)
    • 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

Mitsubishi Vehicles:

  • Eclipse 2.4L (SOHC)
    • 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

Mitsubishi Vehicles:

  • Galant 2.4L (SOHC)
    • 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
  • Montero Sport (3.0L)
    • 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003