How To Find The BAD Or Clogged Fuel Injector

In this section I'm gonna' describe the method I have successfully used to find a bad (or clogged) fuel injector. The process is pretty straightfoward and I think it'll help you nail down the problem.

OK, these are the diagnostic steps I would take on my 1.3L Swift:

  1. Find the ‘dead’ cylinder first.
    1. This requires checking for specific misfire codes (P0301, P0302, P0303,P0304) or doing a cylinder balance test.
  2. Once the ‘dead’ cylinder is found, the next step is to make sure it's getting spark.
    1. This means using a spark tester on the spark plug wire or the ignition coil.
    2. It's important that you check that the spark plug boot and spark plug are NOT soaked (or swimming) in engine oil.
    3. You should also remove the spark plug and check it for cracks or carbon tracks (this is SO important).
      1. Here's a real life case study on carbon tracks and how they can cause a Misfire: Carbon Tracks Are A Common Cause Of Ignition Misfires.
    4. The key here is to eliminate the ignition coil, the spark plug wire and the spark plug as the cause of the cylinder's misfire.
  3. If spark is present, then the next step is checking that that cylinder has good compression.
    1. This is one of the most overlooked tests when diagnosing a misfire or rough idle condition. You can find the test here:
      1. How To Test Engine Compression (Suzuki 1.3L, 1.6L, 1.8L, 2.0L, 2.3L).
  4. Noid light test.
    1. If every test above checks out OK, then the next step is to do a fuel injector Noid light test.
    2. The Noid light test will help you make sure that the fuel injector is being activated.
    3. The following Noid light article/tutorial may help you: How To Use A Noid Light And Where To Buy it (I know that this is not the most in-depth article on the subject, but it should give you an idea of what is involved).
  1. Swap the fuel injector with its neighbor on the fuel injector rail.
    1. If I've found out that I have a specific ‘dead’ cylinder and:
      1. The ignition system is not at fault.
      2. That cylinder's compression value is good (compared to the rest of the cylinders).
      3. The fuel injector resistance is good and...
      4. I think the fuel injector is clogged, I then swap out that fuel injector with its neighbor.
      If the misfire now follows that swap, I now know that fuel injector is clogged (or bad) and needs to be cleaned or replaced.

Finding the bad/clogged fuel injector can be a challenge on your 1.3L Suzuki Swift (1.3L Chevrolet Metro) but it's doable. What will help you save a lot of time, money and frustration is to first find the ‘dead’ cylinder. Following the above diagnostic strategy has saved my lunch quite a few times and I think it'll help you too!

Where To Buy The Fuel Injector And Save

Check out the following links and comparison shop the fuel injector on your 1.3L Suzuki Swift (Chevy Metro):

Not sure if the above fuel injectors fit your particular 1.3L Suzuki? Don't worry, once you click on the links and arrive on the site, they'll make sure it fits! If it doesn't, they'll find you the right one.

More 1.3L Suzuki Diagnostic Tutorials

You can find a complete list of 1.3L Swift tutorials in this index: Suzuki 1.3L Index Of Articles and here: Suzuki 1.3L Index of Articles -troubleshootmyvehicle.com.

Here's a small sample of the tutorials you'll find in the index:

  1. How To Test The Ignition Coils Suzuki: Swift, Vitara - Chevy: Metro, Tracker.
  2. Blown Head Gasket Test (Suzuki 1.3L, 1.6L, 1.8L, 2.0L, 2.3L, 2.5L).
  3. How To Troubleshoot A Misfire (Suzuki 1.3L, 1.6L, 1.8L, 2.0L, 2.3L).
  4. How To Test for a Broken Timing Belt (1.3L Swift -Metro) (at troubleshootmyvehicle.com).
  5. How To Test The TP Sensor (1998-2001 1.3L Swift / Chevy Metro) (at troubleshootmyvehicle.com).
buy me a beer

If this info really saved the day, buy me a beer!

Chevrolet Vehicles:

  • Metro 1.3L
    • 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001

Suzuki Vehicles:

  • Swift 1.3L
    • 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001