Chrysler 2.5L 4-Cylinder Index of Articles

The MAP sensor, on the 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999 2.5L OHV Dodge Dakota, can be easily tested with a multimeter and a vacuum pump. In this tutorial, I'll show you how to... [read more]

The throttle position sensor on the 1996, 1997, 1998, and 1999 2.5L OHV Dodge Dakota is probably one of the easiest components to test. In this tutorial, I will explain... [read more]

When the O2 sensor's heater element, on your 1993, 1994, or 1995 2.5L Dodge Dakota fails, the OBD I fuel injection computer will usually set a trouble code 21 (O2 Stays At... [read more]

If you suspect that the head gasket on your 2.5L Dodge Dakota is blown, then this is the tutorial that you need to be able to check it out. Testing for a blown head... [read more]

Testing the engine compression is probably one of the most overlooked diagnostic tests when trying to find the source of a hard to find rough idle condition or a misfire... [read more]

When the ignition coil fails, on your 1993-1995 2.5L SOHC Dodge Dakota, the engine is going to crank but not start due to a lack of spark. Testing the ignition coil, to... [read more]

The manifold absolute pressure sensor, commonly known as the MAP sensor, is a key component of your 1994-1995 2.5L SOHC Dodge Dakota's engine management system. So when... [read more]

When a trouble code P0141 lights up the check engine light (CEL) on your 2.5L Dodge Dakota's instrument cluster, it usually means that the rear O2 sensor's heater element is... [read more]

The throttle position sensor on the 1993-1995 2.5L SOHC Dodge Dakota can be easily tested with just a multimeter. As a matter of fact, you don't even have to remove it from... [read more]