How To Test TCC Solenoid (1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 2.0L Honda CR-V)

Testing the TCC solenoid assembly on the 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001 2.0L Honda CR-V is not hard. In this tutorial I'll explain the test you need to perform to find out if it's defective or not.

Testing the TCC solenoid assembly, which is made up of two solenoids, simply involves measuring the internal resistance of each solenoid and then applying power (via a jumper wire) to each one to see if they make a clicking sound.

NOTE: The TCC solenoid assembly is also known as the lock-up control solenoid valve assembly.

Puedes encontrar este tutorial en Español aquí: Cómo Probar Los Solenoides TCC (1997-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V) (en: autotecnico-online.com).

NOTE: You can find the test procedures for the shift solenoid A and B assembly and the linear shift solenoid in these two tutorials:

  1. How To Test: Shift Solenoids A And B (1997-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V).
  2. How To Test: A/T Clutch Pressure Control Solenoid (1997-2001 2.0L Honda CR-V).

Symptoms Of A Defective TCC Solenoid

How To Test TCC Solenoid (1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 2.0L Honda CR-V)

The TCC solenoid (lock-up solenoid valve) assembly is made up of 2 individual solenoids (solenoids A and B). Solenoid B has a green with black stripe (GRN/BLK) wire. Solenoid A has a yellow wire (YEL). Both are tested in the exact same way.

The TCC solenoid A and B assembly is located on the top side of your Honda CR-V's automatic transmission. It's right near where the lower radiator hose enters the cylinder head.

The TCC solenoid A and B assembly looks very similar to the shift solenoid A and B assembly. This is how you can tell them apart:

  1. TCC solenoid A and B assembly's connector has:
    1. A yellow (YEL) wire. This wire connects to TCC solenoid A.
    2. A green with black stripe (GRN/BLK) wire. This wire connects to TCC solenoid B
  2. Shift solenoid A and B assembly's connector has:
    1. A blue with yellow stripe (BLU/YEL) wire.
    2. A green with white strip (GRN/WHT) wire.

Your Honda CR-V's automatic transmission is computer controlled so when one of the shift solenoids on the TCC solenoid assembly fails, you're gonna' have one of the following trouble codes stored in the PCM's memory (and lighting the check engine light):

  1. P1753: TCC Solenoid Valve A
  2. P1758: TCC Solenoid Valve B

You're also gonna' see:

  1. Harsh upshifting from lower to higher gear.
  2. Flares when upshifting from lower to higher gear.
  3. Lock up clutch does not engage.
  4. Lock up clutch does not dis-engage.
  5. Lock up clutch does operate smoothly.

TEST 1: TCC Solenoid A And B Resistance Test

How To Test TCC Solenoid Assembly -Lock-Up Solenoid Valves (1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001 2.0L Honda CR-V)

The very first thing we're gonna' do is to check the resistance of TCC solenoid A and TCC solenoid B.

The resistance specification is 12-25 Ohms for each solenoid.

NOTE: This test is done on the connector of the TCC solenoid assembly itself, which has male spade terminals.

OK, let's get testing:

  1. 1

    Place your multimeter in Ohms mode.

  2. 2

    Disconnect the TCC solenoid assembly from its electrical connector.

  3. 3

    To check TCC solenoid A, measure the resistance between terminal labeled with the #2 and the solenoid assembly's body (see the illustration above).

    NOTE: TCC solenoid A is grounded through the TCC solenoid assembly's case. If the solenoid assembly is still bolted to the transmission housing, you can ground your multimeter's lead directly on the battery's negative (-) terminal.

  4. 4

    To check solenoid B, measure the resistance between terminal labeled with the #1 and the solenoid assembly's body (see the illustration above).

    NOTE: TCC solenoid B is grounded through the TCC solenoid assembly's case. If the solenoid assembly is still bolted to the transmission housing, you can ground your multimeter's lead directly on the battery's negative (-) terminal.

  5. 5

    Each solenoid should have a resistance value of 12-25 Ohms.

Let's analyze your resistance test results:

CASE 1: The resistance of each solenoid was between 12-25 Ohms. This is the correct and expected test result and generally means that shift solenoid A and shift solenoid B are OK.

Although the shift solenoid A and B passed this test, we have one more test to do. This is to manually apply power to the solenoids and see if each one clicks (when it gets power). For this test go to: TEST 2: Applying 12 Volts To TCC Solenoid A And B.

CASE 2: The resistance of TCC solenoid A WAS NOT between 12-25 Ohms. This test result let's you know that TCC solenoid A is bad. Replace the TCC solenoid assembly.

CASE 3: The resistance of TCC solenoid B WAS NOT between 12-25 Ohms. This test result let's you know that TCC solenoid B is bad. Replace the TCC solenoid assembly.