TEST 2: Making Sure The MAP Sensor Is Getting 5 Volts

Making Sure The MAP Sensor Is Getting 5 Volts. How To Test The MAP Sensor (1995, 1996, 1997 2.7L Honda Accord)

In this test secti0n we're gonna' make sure that the manifold absolute pressure (MAP) sensor is receiving 5 Volts.

These 5 Volts are supplied to the MAP sensor by the yellow with white stripe (YEL/WHT) wire of its connector.

In the photo above, I've labeled the YEL/WHT stripe wire with the number 1.

We'll use a multimeter in Volts DC mode to find out if 5 Volts are present in the YEL/WHT wire.

These are the test steps:

  1. 1

    Place your multimeter in Volts DC mode.

  2. 2

    Disconnect the MAP sensor from its electrical connector.

  3. 3

    Gently probe the terminal that connects to the yellow with white stripe (YEL/WHT) wire with the red multimeter test lead.

    NOTE: Be careful and don't damage the female terminal. I recommend using a back probe on the connector or a wire piercing probe on the wire.

  4. 4

    Connect the black multimeter test lead to the negative (-) battery terminal.

  5. 5

    Have a helper turn the key to the ON position but don't start the engine.

  6. 6

    The multimeter should display 4.5 to 5 Volts on its screen.

Let's examine your test result:

CASE 1: The multimeter registered 4.5 to 5 Volts. This is the correct test result and confirms that the MAP sensor is getting power.

The next step is to see if the MAP sensor is receiving Ground. For this test go to: TEST 3: Making Sure The MAP Sensor Is Getting Ground.

CASE 2: The multimeter DID NOT register 4.5 to 5 Volts. Without these 5 Volts the manifold absolute pressure sensor will not function.

The two most likely reasons for these missing 5 Volts are:

  1. An open-circuit problem in the wire between the connector and the fuel injection computer.
  2. The fuel injection computer may be fried internally (very rare).

Altho' it's beyond the scope of this tutorial to test these two conditions, you have now eliminated the MAP sensor itself as the cause of the trouble code (DTC) lighting up the check engine light (CEL).

TEST 3: Making Sure The MAP Sensor Is Getting Ground

Making Sure The MAP Sensor Is Getting Ground. How To Test The MAP Sensor (1995, 1996, 1997 2.7L Honda Accord)

So far, the previous two tests have confirmed that:

  1. The MAP sensor is not producing a decreasing/increasing voltage as you applied/released vacuum to it.
  2. The MAP sensor is getting 5 Volts.

For the last test, we'll check that the green with white stripe (GRN/WHT) wire is feeding the MAP sensor with Ground.

IMPORTANT: If you probe the front of the female terminal, probe it very gently with your multimeter test leads. Or you run the risk of damaging the terminal.

CAUTION: The fuel injection computer provides Ground for the MAP sensor. Be careful and don't short the wire to battery 12 Volts or you'll fry the computer. The multimeter voltage test I'm suggesting is a safe way to test for Ground in this wire.

Let's get testing:

  1. 1

    Place your multimeter in Volts DC mode.

  2. 2

    Disconnect the MAP sensor from its electrical connector.

  3. 3

    Gently probe the female terminal that connects to the wire labeled number 2 in the photo above with the black multimeter test lead.

    This is the terminal that belongs to the green with white stripe (GRN/WHT) wire of the MAP sensor's 3-wire connector.

    NOTE: Be careful and don't damage the female terminal. I recommend using a back probe on the connector or a wire piercing probe on the wire.

  4. 4

    Connect the red multimeter test lead to the battery positive (+) terminal.

  5. 5

    Have your helper turn the key to the ON position but don't start the engine.

  6. 6

    Your multimeter should display 10 to 12 Volts if Ground is present.

Let's examine your test result:

CASE 1: The multimeter showed 10 to 12 Volts. This test result tells you that Ground that the GRN/WHT wire is feeding Ground to the MAP sensor.

With this test result you can conclude that the MAP sensor is bad and needs to be replaced if you have confirmed:

  1. That the MAP voltage signal does not decrease when you apply vacuum to the MAP sensor (TEST 1).
  2. That the YEL/WHT wire is supplying 5 Volts DC (TEST 2).
  3. That the GRN/WHT wire is supplying Ground.

If you need to buy a new MAP sensor, check out my MAP sensor recommendations here: Where To Buy The MAP Sensor And Save.

CASE 2: The multimeter DID NOT show 10 to 12 Volts. Without Ground, the MAP sensor will not function.

This usually indicates a problem with either the PCM (internal fault/problem) or an open in the wire between the MAP sensor and the PCM itself.

Altho' testing these two conditions are beyond the scope of this tutorial, you have now eliminated the MAP sensor itself as the cause of the diagnostic trouble code (DTC) lighting up the check engine light (CEL).

MAP Sensor Code Won't Go Away

In some cases, after replacing the MAP sensor, the check engine light keeps coming back with a MAP sensor code.

This usually happens due to some sort of mechanical problem or a lack of fuel pressure causing the engine to produce erratic intake manifold pressure.

Here are a few suggestions on what to check (if this is what's happening in your specific situation):

  1. Check the MAP sensor's O-ring. There's a good chance that the o-ring on the MAP sensor's vacuum inlet nipple (the part that goes into the intake manifold to sense the vacuum) is torn, missing or distorted. When this happens, ambient air will leak into the intake manifold and skew the MAP sensor's readings.
  2. Check engine compression. Worn or damaged cylinder head valves or piston rings will cause the engine to produce erratic and low vacuum readings that can fool the fuel injection computer into thinking the MAP sensor is bad.
    1. How To Test Engine Compression (1995-1997 2.7L Honda Accord).
  3. The MAP sensor is failing intermittently. Which means that it works fine most of the time, but every now and then it doesn't:
    1. I have found that the best way to test these intermittent failures is to slightly tap the MAP sensor with the handle of a screw-driver and see if this tapping screws up the voltage readings as I apply vacuum.
  4. Check the MAP sensor's connector. See if the MAP sensor connector is broken (this could be causing an intermittent open-circuit or short-circuit problem in the MAP signal wire). This usually happens when the MAP sensor's electrical connector's locking tab has broken.
  5. Check the fuel pump's pressure with a fuel pressure test gauge. A failing fuel pump causing low fuel pressure and not send enough fuel to keep the engine humming along nicely will have adverse effects on the intake manifold vacuum pressure the MAP sensor is sensing. To check for this, I recommend a fuel pressure test.

More 2.7L V6 Honda Accord Tutorials

You can find a complete list of 2.7L V6 Honda Accord tutorials in this index:

  1. Honda 2.7L Index of Articles.

Here's a small sample of the tutorials you'll find in the index:

  1. How To Test Engine Compression (1995-1997 2.7L Honda Accord).
  2. How To Test The Head Gaskets (1995-1997 2.7L Honda Accord).
  3. P0420 -What Does It Mean? (1996-1997 2.7L Honda Accord).
  4. How To Test The Ignition System (1995-1997 2.7L Honda Accord).
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