TEST 6: Making Sure The Crankshaft Position Sensor Is Getting Power

Making Sure The Crank Sensor Is Getting Power. Ignition Coil And Crank Sensor Tests (1.8L, 2.4L Mitsubishi)

When the crankshaft position sensor goes bad on your Mitsubishi vehicle, the car will experience a No Spark No Start Condition. To be a little more specific, the ignition coils will not spark on any of their spark plug wires or boots. Also, the PCM will not create and feed a Triggering Signal to them.

Testing the crank sensor is very easy and in the following three test steps you'll find out if it's bad or not.

The very first thing that has to done is to make sure the crank sensor is getting power, which in this case is 12 Volts. Now, the connector that you see in the photo above is located need the right/front corner of the valve cover and sandwiched between the exhaust manifold and the coolant reservoir bottle.

These are the test steps:

  1. 1

    Place your multimeter in Volts DC mode.

  2. 2

    Connect the red lead of the multimeter, with an appropriate tool, to the wire identified with the number 2 in the photo. This should be a red wire.

  3. 3

    Ground the black lead of the multimeter directly on the battery's negative (-) terminal.

  4. 4

    Have your assistant turn the key on without cranking the engine.

  5. 5

    Your multimeter should register 12 Volts.

Let's examine your test result:

CASE 1: The multimeter showed 10 to 12 Volts. This is the correct test result and confirms that the CKP sensor is getting power.

The next step is to make sure its Ground circuit is OK too, go to: TEST 8: Making Sure The Crankshaft Position Sensor Is Getting Ground.

CASE 2: The multimeter DID NOT show 10 to 12 Volts. This indicates that the CKP sensor is not getting power. Without 10 to 12 Volts, the CKP will not work and your Mitsubishi vehicle will crank but not start. Repairing the cause of this missing voltage should solve your vehicle's No Spark No Start condition.

TEST 7: Making Sure The Crankshaft Position Sensor Is Getting Ground

Making Sure The Crank Sensor Is Getting Ground. Ignition Coil And Crank Sensor Tests (1.8L, 2.4L Mitsubishi)

Testing the Ground circuit of the crankshaft position sensor follows pretty much the same path as the above power test although with some slight changes, here are the steps:

  1. 1

    Place your multimeter in Volts DC mode.

  2. 2

    Connect the black lead of the multimeter, with an appropriate tool, to the wire identified with the number 3 in the photo.

    This should be a brown wire.

  3. 3

    Connect the red lead directly on the battery's positive (+) terminal.

  4. 4

    Your multimeter should register 10 to 12 Volts with or without the Key in the On position.

Let's examine your test result:

CASE 1: The multimeter showed 10 to 12 Volts. This is the correct test result and confirms that the CKP sensor is getting Ground.

The next step is check that the crank sensor is creating a crankshaft position signal, go to: TEST 9: Crankshaft Position Sensor Signal Test.

CASE 2: The multimeter DID NOT show 10 to 12 Volts. This indicates that the CKP sensor doesn't have a good path to Ground.

Without a path to Ground, the CKP will not work and your Mitsubishi vehicle will crank but not start. Repairing the cause of this missing Ground should solve your vehicle's No Spark No Start condition.

TEST 8: Crankshaft Position Sensor Signal Test

Crankshaft Position Sensor Signal Test. Ignition Coil And Crank Sensor Tests (1.8L, 2.4L Mitsubishi)

This test will require that you crank the engine by hand. You will need to use a 1/2 in. drive ratchet wrench and a long 1/2 in. drive extension to turn the crankshaft pulley by hand.

IMPORTANT: Both ignition coils MUST be disconnected from their electrical connectors before and during this test!

  1. 1

    Disconnect both ignition coil connectors. This is important!

  2. 2

    Place your multimeter in Volts DC mode.

  3. 3

    Connect the re lead of the multimeter, with an appropriate tool, to the wire identified with the number 1 in the photo. This should be a GREEN with red stripe wire.

  4. 4

    Connect the black lead directly on the battery's negative (-) terminal or a good Ground point on the engine.

  5. 5

    Turn the key to the On position.

  6. 6

    With an appropriate tool, turn the crankshaft pulley by hand.

    Do not crank the engine with the key from inside of the vehicle.

  7. 7

    Your multimeter will register an ON/OFF voltage signal as you crank the engine by hand.

    ‘ON’ will register 5 Volts on the multimeter and ‘OFF’ will register 0.1 Volts.

Let's examine your test result:

CASE 1: The multimeter registered the On/Off voltage values the whole time you hand cranked the engine. This is the correct test result and lets you know that the crankshaft position sensor is working and is not the cause of your 'no spark no start' condition.

CASE 2: The multimeter DID NOT register the On/Off voltage values then the crankshaft position sensor is bad and needs to be replaced. Replacing the crank sensor will solve your 'no spark no start' condition on your 2.4L (SOHC) Mitsubishi vehicle (or 2.4L (SOHC) Chrysler Sebring or Dodge Stratus).

Chrysler Vehicles:

  • Sebring 2.4L (SOHC)
    • 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

Dodge Vehicles:

  • Stratus 2.4L (SOHC)
    • 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

Mitsubishi Vehicles:

  • Eclipse 2.4L (SOHC)
    • 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005

Mitsubishi Vehicles:

  • Galant 2.4L (SOHC)
    • 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2003, 2004
  • Lancer 2.4L (SOHC)
    • 2002, 2003, 2004, 2005, 2006
  • Mirage 1.8L
    • 1997, 1998, 1999, 2000, 2001, 2002
  • Outlander 2.4L (SOHC)
    • 2003, 2004, 2005